Fifa World Cup 2022

Qatar will host the 2022 FIFA World Cup as per the decision of the FIFA Executive Committee who voted in a secret ballot on 2 December 2010 in Zurich. Five candidates Qatar, Australia, Korea Republic, Japan and USA presented their bids to stage the 2022 edition of the world’s greatest sporting event. USA, Japan and Korea had all previously staged the FIFA World Cup finals, with Japan and Korea becoming the tournament’s first joint hosts back in 2002. The 1994 finals took place in the USA. It will be the first World Cup in the Middle East, and the first Arab country to host the FIFA World Cup, and the first in Asia since 2002. 

Fifa World Cup 2022 stadiums (Proposed)

Under the proposal to FIFA, Qatar will build 9 new stadiums and renovate 3, with the 12 venues divided among 7 host cities. The 7 host cities are Al-Daayen, Al-Khor, Al-Rayyan, Al-Shamal, Al-Wakrah, Doha and Umm Slal.  The proposed Lusail Iconic Stadium is scheduled to host the opening and final matches, and will be situated in a whole city (Lusail) that is yet to be built. Construction is due to begin in 2014 or 2015.Qatar's bid organisers say that the stadiums will be zero-carbon emitting and climate controlled (The Fifa World Cup is always held in Europe's off-season in June and July, and during this time Qatar's average daytime high is in excess of 40 °C). The stadiums will take measures to reduce solar radiation and warm winds, and provide soft air conditioning to provide adequate climatic conditions.

Lusail Iconic Stadium Capacity: 86,250

Host city

Al-Daayen

Construction status

To be built

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Opening match, group matches, round of 16, quarter final, semi-final, final

Khalifa International Stadium  Capacity: 50,000 (plans to expand to 68,030)

Host city

Al-Rayyan

Construction status

Major renovation

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Group matches, round of 16, quarter-finals, semi-finals

Al-Rayyan Stadium Capacity: 21,282 (plans to expand to 44,740)

Host city

Al-Rayyan

Construction status

Major renovation

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Group matches

Al-Gharafa Stadium Capacity: 21,282  (plans to expand to 44,740)

Host city

Al-Rayyan

Construction status

Major renovation

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Group matches

Education city stadium   Capacity: 45,350  (planned) 

Host city

Al-Rayyan

Construction status

To be built

Owner/investors

Qatar Foundation / Government

Matches planned

Group matches, round of 16

Doha Port Stadium Capacity: 44,950 (planned)

Host city

Doha

Construction status

To be built

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Group matches, round of 16, quarter-finals

Al-Wakrah Stadium Capacity: 45,120  (planned)

Host city

Al-Wakrah

Construction status

To be built

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Group matches, round of 16

Al-Shamal Stadium Capacity: 45,120 (planned)

Host city

Al-Shamal

Construction status

To be built

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Group matches

Al-Khor Stadium Capacity: 45,330 (planned)

Host city

Al-Khor

Construction status

To be built

Owner/investors

Qatar Olympic Committee / Government

Matches planned

Group matches, round of 16

 

Umm Salal Stadium Capacity: 45,120 (planned)

Host city

Umm Salal

Construction status

To be built

 

Qatar University stadium Capacity: 43,520 (planned)

Host city

Doha

Construction status

To be built

 

Sports City stadium Capacity: 47,560 (planned)

Host city

Doha

Owner/investors

Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup Supreme Committee

Construction status

To be built

 

Recent Controversies 

A number of groups and media outlets have so far expressed concern over the suitability of Qatar to host the event with regard to interpretations of human rights, particularly worker conditions, the rights of fans in the LGBT community (Gay community), and climatic conditions and even some FIFA officials were accused of corruption and allowing Qatar to "buy" the World Cup,

The issue of migrant workers' rights has also attracted attention, with an investigation by the Guardian newspaper claiming that many workers are denied food and water, have their identity papers taken away from them, and that they are not paid on time or at all, making some of them in effect slaves. The Guardian has estimated that up to 4,000 workers may die due to lax safety and other causes by the time the competition is held. These claims are based upon the fact that 400 Nepalese and over 700 migrant Indian workers have already died on various building sites in the country since 2010, when Qatar's bid as World Cup's host was won.

Despite the claims, the government of Qatar insists that the corruption allegations are being driven by envy and mistrust by those who do not want the World Cup staged in such a country.